Beyond Customer Interviews: From Post-Its to Product

Now that you’ve nailed conducting killer customer interviews and are getting good customer stories; what’s next? How do we take a collection of conversation notes and turn them into concepts for awesome products?

Let’s take a look at one way through the product design process.

One of our go-tos for compiling and analyzing feedback is the affinity map. To affinity map your feedback, take all of the quotes and observations from your interview, write them on Post-its, and stick them to the wall. Once they’re all up, move the stickies around to group “similar” things together.

The groups that emerge from this exercise will lead to a number of insights and questions. For example, “It looks like most customers shopping in groups took multiple sizes into the dressing rooms at once. Lone shoppers didn’t; I wonder if social shoppers optimize trips to the dressing room while less frequent shoppers don’t. If so, I wonder why?”

Repeat this several times, remapping the sticky notes according to different similarities. Though it may seem redundant, forcing the team to do this one more time than feels reasonable can lead to great insights. Also, don’t shy away from seemingly strange groupings. Strange can be important.

Some of the insights you gather will help define customer segments – classes of customers that behave in similar ways, have similar needs, and share demographics. Some will help identify problems or needs of the customers.

So what do you do with a bunch of customer segments and insights about their needs? A great tool we often use is the problem statement:

“CUSTOMER SEGMENT needs a better way to VALUE PROP because PROBLEM/NEED”

It’s important to come up with several of these statements before selecting one. While it’s easier to rush through the process and settle on the first thing you come up with, this proves to be far less fruitful in the long run.

Even more importantly, make sure you don’t embed your ideas for the solution into the problem statement. This often results in a problem statement with only one possible solution. For example, “College students need a better way to order pizza because they can’t order pizza from their mobile devices.” A better alternative is, “College students need a better way to order pizza because they often want one while out dancing, where it’s too loud for phone calls.”

To identify a good problem statement, start with a quick brainstorm of solution ideas and questions. A good problem statement makes it really easy to come up with ideas. Don’t worry about the quality, just make sure you can come up with many ideas and questions.

Problem statements that are too narrow will only allow for a few ideas that fit. Those that are too broad lack structure and lead to blank page syndrome.

With a problem statement selected and a long list of (mostly silly, strange, or outright bad) concepts and questions, it’s time to pick a few favorites. You can do this by dot voting on the brainstorm stickies, giving everyone on the team three votes and stack ranking the results based on votes.

Great work. Now that you have some concepts and questions in hand it’s time to start Customer Validation.

More on that later.

One thought on “Beyond Customer Interviews: From Post-Its to Product

  1. Using 25/10 to generate the list of ideas post-problem statement is also fruitful. The statement formula you came up with works incredibly well when following it with a P2P (incorporating 25/10 into the Practices element).

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